The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica

The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica
The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica
The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica
The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica

The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica
During one of her many visits to Moscow, Brilliant looked to create an alternative memorial sculpture to'Ever Living - The Arm', commemorating the six million lost souls of the Holocaust. She met Chief Rabbi Levene (Levin) at the Moscow Synagogue who she discussed her concept with and who suggested the shofaer. The hands holding the shoaefer based on Chief Rabbi Levene's hands. Inspiration/concept and development of written by Fredda Brilliant in her book'Biographies in Bronze', Shapolsky Books, 1986, p. 67 cm high, weighing approx 20kg. Fredda Brilliant was a significant Polish sculptor active in the 20th century. Brilliant with her writer husband Herbert Marshall travelled widely over her lifetime, producing sculptures of significant figures from across the world. Her portraits include those of Buckminster Fuller, J. Kennedy, Anton Chekhov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Sergei Eisenstein and Duncan Grant. Whilst living in India, figures including V. Krishna Menon, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Indira Gandhi. She also completed significant public commissions in the UK, most notably her large-scale sculpture of Mahatma Gandhi in Tavistock Square Gardens, Bloomsbury district of London and outside the Supreme Court of India, Delhi. As such, Brilliants works are incredibly powerful documents of the political, cultural, and social developments taking place across the world throughout the 20th century. Pablo Picasso invited Brilliant to visit him at his home and use him as a subject, but she refused when he pinched her bottom while her husband was present.

Rabbi Levin was a native of Lithuania and studied for the rabbinate in that Baltic republic. After World War I he was reported to have served in the Ukraine before being appointed to Moscow. In New York, the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, a major coordinating agency, called Rabbi Levin's death a great and tragic loss.

In spite of the many pressures and handicaps placed on him by the Soviet Union, with its repressive policy toward Jews and its denial of their religious freedom, Rabbi Levin saw his role as that of a servant of the religious Jews of Moscow. Berzon, president of the Rabbinical Council of America, an association of nearly 1,000 Orthodox rabbis here and in Canada, described Rabbi Levin as a tragic and heroic figure, tragic because he had to preside over periods of Russian repression and had to make statements defending the actions of the Russian Government. He was a heroic figure because he realized that in periods of oppression the need for leadership was greatest. He fulfilled that role fully. The New York Times 18th November 1971.

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The Last Outcry' bronze sculpture by Fredda Brilliant / Shoafer / Judaica


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